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Blanca Luz Brum’s perpetual orgy

Blanca Luz Brum ended her days supporting Pinochet and walking naked on the island of Robinson Crusoe (formerly known as Isla Más a Tierra), in the Juan Fernández archipelago, which bore the name of Defoe’s novel because she asked President Eduardo Frei to do so. But, for many years, Blanca Luz was a wild and revolutionary woman, who married five times, published books of poems that very few remember today, went from communism and her passion for José Carlos Mariátegui to working with Perón (in 1972 she wrote ‘In the arms of his people Perón returns’ and he distinguished her by inviting her to his third inauguration as president of the country on October 12, 1973), who met Sandino in Mexico and wrote about him in his book ‘Blanca Luz contra la current’ (published by Ercilla in Santiago de Chile in 1936), and of which Neruda told in his memoirs that he gave himself to him, with García Lorca as a troubled witness.

Neruda, while he was undressing her, asked Lorca to go make sure no one was coming, and when he was carrying out the order, the man from Granada stumbled, fell and broke his leg. Blanca Luz confirmed Lorca’s accident, but denied that she wanted to have sexual relations with Neruda.

On the contrary, it was he, in a drunken state, who tried to take her to bed. In any case, everything would have been possible, because Brum’s sexual exploits went around America, and it is said that when Vicente Huidobro invited her to his house, the poet’s wife, seeing her walking around the room naked, threw her out with weathered boxes.

She was born in Pan de Azúcar (Uruguay) in 1905, and at the age of 19 she ran away from the school where she was boarding school and married the poet Juan Parra del Riego, who would die a few months later after dedicating a book of poems to her, ‘Blanca Luz’, published in Montevideo in 1925. Only a few days before his son Eduardo had been born.

Her second husband will be an avant-garde and revolutionary poet, César Miró Quesada, with whom she marries only to be close to Mariátegui, who was really the one she was in love with. By then, in 1926, Blanca Luz had published two books of poems that I have never seen. At that time he collaborated in ‘Amauta’, the avant-garde magazine directed by Mariátegui, and created his own magazine, ‘Guerrilla’, with a title sufficiently indicative of where his political and literary interests were heading. Her highest moment will come with her marriage to the Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros, who will be the great love of her life.

That relationship, stormy and passionate, which will end with Siqueiros assaulting his wife in public in a bar in Montevideo, will lead her to visit her husband in prison and follow him into exile (his communist militancy in Mexico at the time, with the outlawed party, meant living a high-risk life), but also to party with Marlene Dietrich, Chaplin or Charles Laugthon in Hollywood or to alternate at parties with Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. When she breaks up with Siqueiros, she will choose rich and influential husbands and she will decide never to go through hardship again, although she will have to see how her two sons die in their youth.

Miguel Albero has just dedicated a delicious monograph to Brum, published in Malaga by Zut. It’s a little gem and an unbeatable guide to meet the Uruguayan. I only had one of his books, but I’m going to look for the others. Although it will be difficult for the work to surpass life.

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